Book Launch: "The Future of Power"

  • Monday, Feb 7, 2011

  • Professor Joseph Nye launched his new book, The Future of Power, at CSIS on February 7, 2011. After 20 years of examining power, Nye in his latest work updates our understanding of power for the twenty-first century. Over the coming years, Nye argues, the world will experience two significant changes in the power landscape—a power transition and a power diffusion. Contrary to what many believe, America is not in decline. Rather we are witnessing the “rise of the rest” as Asia returns to its historic significance in global affairs. This marks a clear power transition from West to East. Perhaps more significant, however, is the ongoing power diffusion. The global stage grows more and more crowded as advances in communications and computing reduce the cost barriers to participation. In light of these trends, using hard and soft power smartly will become even more relevant in the days ahead.

    "The Future of Power"

    with author

    Professor Joseph S. Nye, Jr.
    Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and CSIS Trustee

    and panelists

    The Honorable Carla A. Hills
    Chairman and CEO, Hills and Company and CSIS Trustee

    The Honorable Thomas R. Pickering
    Vice Chair, Hills and Company and Distinguished Senior Advisor, CSIS

    Moderated by

    Dr. Stephen J. Flanagan
    Senior Vice President and Henry A. Kissinger Chair, CSIS

    In his new book, Prof. Nye examines the changing nature of power in the global information age and argues that the story of American decline is simplistic and inaccurate. He contends that if the U.S. seems less powerful than it used to be, that may be because all states are less powerful than they were, relative to the power of individuals and non-state groups.

    At this event, the author and this distinguished panel of experts discussed the book's insights and answered  questions on a range of topics on American foreign policy, the critical international challenges of today's world, and how U.S. power can best be deployed to address them. 

     

     

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