Dealing with a Nuclear Iran

Redlines and Deadlines
  • Wednesday, Feb 6, 2013
  • Agenda

    8:30am-8:45am
    WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION
    Dr. John Hamre, President and CEO, CSIS
     
    8:45am-9:15am
    A conversation with Dr. Olli Heinonen, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University and Sharon Squassoni, Director, Proliferation Prevention Program

    9:15am-9:45am
    A conversation with General James Cartwright (USMC, Ret.), Harold Brown Chair in Defense Policy Studies and Dr. Jon Alterman, Zbigniew Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and Geostrategy and Director, Middle East Program
     
    BREAK

    10:00am-11:00am
    Middle East Equities (Moderated by Dr. Andrew Kuchins, Director and Senior Fellow, Russia and Eurasia Program)

    • The view from Israel, Mr. Haim Malka, Deputy Director and Senior Fellow, Middle East Program, CSIS
    • The view from the Gulf, Dr. Jon Alterman, Zbigniew Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and Geostrategy and Director, Middle East Program

     
    11:00am-12:15pm
    Allies and Others (Moderated by Sharon Squassoni, Director, Proliferation Prevention Program)

    Panelists:

    • European interests, Ms. Heather Conley, Senior Fellow and Director, Europe Program
    • Russian interests, Dr. Andrew Kuchins, Director and Senior Fellow, Russia and Eurasia Program,
    • Sanctions impact and oil markets – Mr. David Pumphrey, Co-Director and Senior Fellow, Energy & National Security Program

    12:15pm-12:30pm

    A conversation with Mr. David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent, The New York Times and Ms. Sharon Squassoni, Director, Proliferation Prevention Program

    Both the Bush and Obama administrations have attempted to end the threat posed by Iran’s nuclear program. Most outside parties fear the implications of Iran growing closer to a real nuclear weapons capability, including how security is calculated throughout the Middle East. The prospect of an Iranian bomb is so daunting that several countries—including the United States—have indicated a willingness to use military action to set back the Iranian effort, and the consequences of such a strike could themselves shake the foundations of diplomatic and security relationships throughout the Middle East.

    With the U.S. and Israeli elections over, and with Iranian elections looming, are there alternatives to a steady Iranian march toward a nuclear weapons capacity? Is it possible to envision a solution or process that could be acceptable to Iran, the United States and its allies, other permanent members of the UN Security Council and Iran’s neighbors? If so, what would it look like and how should it be pursued? What steps should be taken to make it more likely that it is part of a genuine process of de-escalation rather than merely marking time until Iran acquires a weapon?

    Please join us on Wednesday, February 6th for a half-day forum with CSIS experts to consider what successful solutions might require from Iran, the United States and other key states.

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