• Jul 29, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    U.S., North Korea hold "business-like" talks
    Reuters

    Energy policy revised to cut nuclear role
    Japan Times, By Masami Ito

    AP Exclusive: Officials say shot Iranian was nuclear scientist, not student as Tehran claims
    AP

    U.S. accuses Iran of “secret deal” with al Qaeda financier cell
    Yahoo Blog, By Laura Rozen

    Unresolved Kashmir root cause of tension: Shabbir
    The Nation (Pakistan)

  • Jul 28, 2011

     

    By Talitha Dowds and Kelley Sayler

    As reported by a New York Times article in June, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates “bluntly criticized NATO nations…for what he said were shortages in military spending and political will, warning of ‘a dim if not dismal future’ unless more member nations scaled up their participation in alliance’s activities.” The NYT article also highlighted NATO’s struggle to “define its place in a post-cold war world.” Both of these sentiments were also discussed at a Brookings event last week which focused on the future of NATO’s nuclear posture, as outlined in Steven Pifer’s recent paper, “NATO, Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control.” Pifer, a Senior Fellow at Brookings, was joined on the panel by Hans Kristensen of the Federation of American Scientists and Franklin Miller of the Scrowcroft Group.

  • Jul 28, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Researchers invent new substance for decontaminating radioactive water
    Mainichi Daily News

    Arms race: 24 more missiles to be added to arsenal
    International Herald Tribune

    British nuclear test veterans take cancer claims to supreme court
    The Guardian, By Owen Bowcott

    Military: Safety concerns prompt destruction of missile minutes after California test launch
    AP

  • Jul 27, 2011

    By Talitha Dowds

    North Korea’s Chief Nuclear Negotiator, Kim Kye-gwan, arrived in New York yesterday to commence discussions with US North Korea envoy, Stephen Bosworth. In a Financial Times article, Mr Kim was quoted as being “optimistic” regarding the pending talks. As for the US sentiments regarding the discussions the article stated that the Obama administration “has decided it is too dangerous not to engage Pyongyang, even if there is little hope of disarmament. “ Victor Cha, of CSIS, also agrees as “there are clear tactical reasons for the US to re-engage.” But as the FT article rightly points out, does anyone have a strategy? Perhaps North Korea figured out that if the NFL can settle its differences, then clearly so can the Koreas. However, engagement is one thing, progress is another.

  • Jul 27, 2011

    TOP NEWS

    N Korean nuclear envoy arrives in New York
    Financial Times

    U.S. Nukes To South Korea?
    The Japan Times by Ralph Cossa

    Yukiya Amano: Japan crisis will not end nuclear age
    BBC

    Who Is Killing Iran's Nuclear Scientists?
    ABC

  • Jul 26, 2011

    By Jonah Friedman

    Cyber security and cyber warfare are topics which have been much-discussed lately. Recent attacks on both corporate and government systems have brought the issue to the fore, as has a Pentagon statement which declares that a cyber attack could be considered an act of war – one which could provoke a physical retaliatory strike. Although perhaps not obvious, there are interesting comparisons to be drawn with the struggle to construct an effective nuclear strategy and declaratory policy.

  • Jul 26, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    NK gearing up for massive military exercise: sources
    Korea Times, By Kang Hyun-kyung

    India’s response to any nuke attack will be heavy: IAF
    PTI

    Foreign Secretaries to meet today
    The Hindu, By Sandeep Dikshit

    Israel, US to hold massive missile defense drill next year
    Jerusalem Post, By Yaakov Katz

    U.S. nuclear security experts blast cuts to anti-nuclear terror program
    Xinhua, By Matthew Rusling

  • Jul 25, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Senior North Korean diplomat set to visit U.S.: Clinton
    Reuters

    Iran denies attack targeted nuclear scientist
    Al Jazeera

    S. Korea, India sign nuclear power cooperation pact
    Yonhap

    U.S. heat wave causes new look at nuclear energy
    CBS News, By Whit Johnson

  • Jul 25, 2011

    By Talitha Dowds

    A Washington Post article last week reported that Iran’s Revolutionary Guard shot down an unnamed U.S spy plane in the city of Qom that was reportedly “trying to gather information on an underground uranium enrichment site.”Secret operations such as these, are evidently in response to Iran’s continued secrecy surrounding its nuclear program. In order to facilitate a discussion in order to gain some insight into Iran’s nuclear program and the challenges this poses for the rest of the world, the Hudson Institute with Partnership for a Secure America held the event, “Perspectives on the Iranian Nuclear Challenge,” on Wednesday, July 13. The panelists included Olli Heinonen, Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Former Deputy Director General of the IAEA, Christopher Ford, Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Technology and Global Security at the Hudson Institute and Former US Special Representative for Nuclear Nonproliferation and lastly, Peter Jones, Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa and former Senior Analyst, Security and Intelligence Secretariat at the Privy Council of Canada.

  • Jul 22, 2011

    By Talitha Dowds

    Since the Pakistani naval base in Karachi was taken over by Taliban militants in May, the question of the extent to which Pakistan’s nuclear arsenals are secure has once again been raised. This however, raises a further question as to how secure its civilian nuclear program is. According to an article in the UK’s Telegraph we have reason to be concerned, according to a Pakistani professor, Pervez Hoodbhoy,

    “… because the most secure installations, bases and headquarters of the military have been successfully attacked by Islamic militants who have sympathizers within the military…what is the proof that nuclear installations or weapon stocks would be exempt from this? My worry is not limited to nuclear arsenals because places that deal with fissile materials can also be similarly infiltrated.”

  • Jul 22, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    North, South Korea hold "constructive" talks
    Reuters, By Michael Martina and Olivia Rondonuwu

    AP Exclusive: Iran prez said pushing for nukes
    AP, By George Jahn

    “Government cannot tinker with Liability Law”
    The Hindu, By Sandeep Dikshit

    DOE Champions 'Game Changing' Small Nuclear Reactors
    The New York Times, By Emily Yehle

  • Jul 22, 2011

    By Kelley Sayler

    The convergence of a number of factors in South Asia – including strategic anxieties, destabilizing military doctrines, and conventional force disparities – places the region in growing danger of succumbing to a nuclear arms race.  Such was the conclusion of a recent SIPRI report that cited India and Pakistan’s parallel expansion of fissile material production capacity and nuclear infrastructure as evidence of the countries’ progressive descent into nuclear competition.  Indian, Pakistani, and American experts gathered to discuss this development, as well as other topics in South Asian security, at a Monday event hosted by the United States Institute for Peace. 

  • Jul 21, 2011

    By Jonah Friedman

    Last week Marine General James Cartwright came out against the Air Force’s plans for a new nuclear-capable bomber, stating that its development is not worthwhile considering the cost and quantities at which it would likely be produced. He also called for a reexamination of what deterrence requires in the future, and argued that our decisions regarding the future of the triad should reflect capabilities the United States wants to maintain rather than cuts made necessary by budget constraints.

  • Jul 21, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Japan Says Number of Cattle Fed With Radioactive Hay Has Doubled
    Bloomberg, By Pavel Alpeyev

    Iran cautiously welcomes Russia's nuclear plan
    AP

    France delays new generation nuclear plant amid new safety concerns
    AP

    Can Europe find a safe place for nuclear waste?
    Christian Science Monitor, By Michael Steininger

  • Jul 20, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    America's Intelligence Denial on Iran
    Wall Street Journal by Fred Fleitz

    France condemns Iran nuclear move
    Financial Times

    U.S. wants IAEA to vet Indian liability law
    The Hindu

  • Jul 19, 2011

    (photo by Jonah Friedman, Moscow 2009)

    By Jonah Friedman

    The Institut Français des Relations Internationales (Ifri) recently put out a report by Pavel Podvig on Russia’s nuclear forces, and possible courses for its size and shape in the future. He gave a good outline of the current status of Russia’s forces, and potential challenges they face in efforts to modernize them. He also noted that nuclear weapons continue to play an important role in Russia’s security calculations, and that any further reductions in its arsenal will depend in large part on whether an agreement can be struck with the United States on issues such as missile defense.

  • Jul 19, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Japan Should Have Nuclear Weapons: Ishihara
    Bloomberg, By Brian Fowler and Sachiko Sakamaki

    Former State Department spokesman: Israel will not attack Iran anytime soon
    Haaretz, By Natasha Mozgovaya

    Iran installs 'speedier' nuclear centrifuges
    AFP, By Farhad Pouladi

    India: 'Massive' uranium find in Andhra Pradesh
    BBC

    Trib probe: PPG linked to 'illicit nuclear trade'
    Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, By Lou Kilzer

  • Jul 18, 2011

    Next week the U.S. Institute of Peace will be running an "Advanced Issues in Strategic Arms Control" program designed for next generation arms controllers. The website describes the program as follows. 

     

    This course provides an introduction to the major arms control issues of the early 21st century, including strategic arms reductions, fissile material cutoff, nuclear testing, space, and cybersecurity.

    The course provides an in-depth look at the objectives and evolution of strategic nuclear arms control from SALT 1 to the present day, and examines critical decisions in arms control and the implecations for world security, including potential avenues for a New START follow-on, prospects for bringing third party countries into negotiations, and the nuclear zero issue.

    Simulations and group discussions sharpen participants' analytical skills.

    As long as nuclear weapons exist, there will be nuclear arms control. Platitudes aside, this could be a great opportunity for grad students and other young professionals in the field to gain some in-depth knowledge and exposure to top experts in the field. Mike Lekson, Steve Pifer, Elaine Bunn, Jennifer Laurendeau, and Barry Blechman are involved along with others. 

    The application instructions aren't entirely clear on this point, but the course fee is $195.

    Bruce MacDonald is running the program with help from Brian Rose. Email Brian at brose@usip.org with questions. 

     

  • Jul 18, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    ASEAN to resume direct talks with nuclear weapon states in Aug.
    Kyodo

    Japan scrambles to protect damaged reactor from typhoon
    CNN

    Romania investigating theft of 64 unarmed missile warheads from train bound for Bulgaria
    AP

    House Approves $1 Billion Cut to Nuclear Agency Funding
    Global Security Newswire, By Martin Matishak

    U.S.-India nuclear deal drifts dangerously
    Washington Post, By Simon Denyer and Rama Lakshmi

  • Jul 15, 2011

    By Jonah friedman

    Earlier this week, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies president Clifford D. May wrote an article in which he claims that deterrence and Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD) no longer apply in a world of nuclear-armed rogue states such as North Korea and (potentially) Iran. He also advocates for the development of space-based ballistic missile defenses (BMD), arguing that this should not be seen as militarizing space as much as “de-militarizing” it by blocking missile attacks.

  • Jul 15, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Japanese debate whether to restart nuclear reactors
    Washington Times

    Iran installing advanced nuclear machines for testing
    Reuters

    UN briefed on Syria's alleged nuclear activities
    Lebanon Now

  • Jul 14, 2011

    By Kelley Sayler

    On July 7-8, PONI hosted its annual Summer Conference at CSIS in Washington, D.C.   The conference included presentations on various political, technical, and legal elements of the nonproliferation regime, as well as on a number of issues impacting the future of strategic stability.

  • Jul 14, 2011

    By Mark Jansson and Jonah Friedman

    Iran announced on Tuesday that it was willing to cooperate more closely with the IAEA if the agency is willing to accept the absence o f outstanding issues regarding the 2007 Work Plan, and say so publicly. Tehran is demanding a “new mechanism” moving forward, now that previous issues have been resolved. IAEA head Yukiya Amano refused to accept this condition, given that he still considers Iran to not be meeting its obligations. However, when it comes to the 2007 document in particular, Iran’s assertion may have some merit.

  • Jul 14, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Fukushima cleanup recruits 'nuclear gypsies' from across Japan
    The Guardian, By Justin McCurry

    U.N. council split likely on Syria atomic issue: U.S.
    Reuters, By Megan Davies

    Pakistani PM condemns anti-nuclear "propaganda"
    Xinhua

    How to Shave a Bundle Off the Deficit: Spend Less on Nukes
    The Atlantic, Joseph Cirincione

  • Jul 13, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Japan PM to outline nuclear phase-down plan
    Channel News Asia

    S. Korea seeks budget cuts for N. Korea denuclearization efforts
    Yonhap

    Iran upbeat on nuclear talks, but stalemate remains
    Reuters

    Task Force Recommends Improvements for Nuclear Plants
    New York Times

  • Jul 12, 2011

     

    Nuclear Policy News – July 12, 2011
     
     
    TOP NEWS
    Kan to explore possibility of nationalizing nuclear operations

    Mainichi Daily News

     
    Iran offers IAEA cooperation, but sets condition

    AP, By George Jahn

     
    Dominion Chief Says Fukushima Crisis Won’t Slow Reactor Plan
     
    White House Deceptive, Not Schizophrenic, on Nuclear Weapons

    The Heritage Foundation

     
  • Jul 11, 2011

     

    Nuclear Policy News – July 11, 2011
     
    TOP NEWS
    Radioactive beef found in Japan
    UPI 
     
    India begins work on 2nd nuclear submarine

    NRC, nuke industry criticized for skirting public

    AP, By Dave Gram

  • Jul 11, 2011

    The State Department's Office of Multilateral Nuclear Affairs is looking for a physical scientist to support several nuclear security efforts, including IAEA safeguards design and implementation; technical issues related to the NPT; nuclear material protection, control and accounting; and FMCT issues. The basic requirement is an undergraduate or graduate degree in physical science, engineering or mathematics, so this could be a great opportunity for young scientist looking to break into the field. 

    Check out the job description here. The closing date for the announcement is July 22. 

     

  • Jul 8, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    China moving toward establishing its first law on nuclear power
    Denki Shimbun

    IAEA worried over Iran plans to triple uranium production
    Reuters

    Pakistan denies N.Korea bribe for nuclear technology
    Reuters, By Chris Allbritton

    Russia admits no chance of sectoral missile defense with NATO
    RIA Novosti

    Obama’s Nuclear Upgrade
    Foreign Affairs, By Keir A. Lieber and Daryl G. Press

  • Jul 7, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Pakistan’s nuclear-bomb maker says North Korea paid bribes for know-how
    Washington Post, By R. Jeffrey Smith

    U.S., Seoul Secure Plans for Potential Counterattack
    Wall Street Journal, By Evan Ramstad

    Pak nuclear stockpile to touch 200 in a decade: American atomic experts
    The Nation (Pakistan)

    India stung by tighter rules on nuke suppliers
    AP, By George Jahn

  • Jul 6, 2011

     

     
    By Jonah Friedman
     
    Last week it was reported that the United States Air Force had submitted its recommendation for how to eliminate the final 20 delivery vehicles required for compliance with the New START treaty force numbers. One of the advantages of the New START treaty was that it did not demand a ceiling on specific types of delivery vehicles, leaving each country free to determine for itself its preferred mix of bombers and missiles. 
     
  • Jul 6, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Japan to hold stress tests at all nuclear plants
    BBC

    Iran fires anti-ship missiles near key Gulf strait
    AFP

    Analysis - Iran's nuclear steps deepen Western suspicions
    Reuters, By Fredrik Dahl

    India is Pak's most important neighbour: Gilani
    TNN, By Omer Farooq Khan

    Western bid to allay Russia’s missile concerns
    Financial Times, By Charles Clover

  • Jul 5, 2011

     

    By Jonah Friedman
     
    Last week the Project on Nuclear Issues hosted a live debate between Robert Joseph of the National Institute for Public Policy, and Steven Pifer of the Brookings Institution. The topic was whether another arms control treaty with Russia is in the U.S. national interest. Audio, video, and a transcript can be found here.
     
  • Jul 5, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    USFK Chief Plays Down N.Korean Military Threat
    Chosun Ilbo

    Iran Guards ready to close Strait of Hormuz
    AFP

    AP Exclusive: Diplomats say Security Council to discuss Syria’s refusal work with nuke probe
    AP

    India hints tough measures against new nuclear trade rules
    Reuters, By C.J. Kuncheria

    Ending nuclear evil
    Al Jazeera, By Desmond Tutu

  • Jul 1, 2011

    The summer conference at CSIS is less than a week away. Registration will be closing at midnight on July 3rd. Relevant links: 

    Please contact Mark Jansson at mjansson@csis.org with any questions. 

     

  • Jul 1, 2011

     

    By Kelley Sayler

    British Foreign Secretary William Hague issued a statement Wednesday accusing Iran of “carrying out covert ballistic missile tests and rocket launches, including testing missiles capable of delivering a nuclear payload in contravention of UN resolution 1929.” While thus far unsubstantiated, such activities would not be a far cry from those identified as areas of concern in the recent IAEA report. For its part, Tehran has dutifully registered its denial of the charges.
     
  • Jul 1, 2011

    By Talitha Dowds

    Last Monday marked the first day of the IAEA week long Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety. The conference was the first high-level global gathering on nuclear safety since the Fukushima accident. The Director General of the IAEA, Yukiya Amano, stressed the need of “maintaining a firm long-term commitment to continuously improving nuclear security. “Business as usual” is not an option.” In his opinion, “an international approach to nuclear safety is essential” as “nuclear accidents respect no boarders.” To this end he proposed a five point plan, in his address to member states at the commencement of the conference, which he believes will “contribute to establishing a realistic and enhanced post-Fukushima nuclear safety frame work. These he hopes would realize his goal of “a new era in which nuclear technology is as safe as humanly possible.”

  • Jul 1, 2011

    TOP STORIES

    Saudis Raise Specter of Nuclear Arms Race
    Israel National News

    Pak has fastest growing n-arsenal: US study
    Indian Express

    Ban welcomes five-party nuclear disarmament meeting
    UN News Center

    Tehran tests Saudis' nerve on nuclear weapons
    The Australian by Yoel Guzansky