Innovation and Globalization

Innovation and Globalization

This project reviews the relationship between IPR, innovation, and economic growth as the world moves further towards a global information economy.

Highlighted Publications:

Governments and Global Supply Chains: Measuring Performance in a Networked World
Governments and Global Supply Chains: Measuring Performance in a Networked World

James A. Lewis
March 2008
Government policies and practices affect economic outcomes.  Improving how companies and consumers connect across borders is a central task for policy.  The best policies are those that offer more opportunities and make it easier to connect, but since this involves an aggregate of many different government activities, this connectivity is not always easy to measure.  The following survey lets governments assess how well they are performing in delivering the services for interconnection.  It provides benchmarks against which they can measure their performance and suggestions for improvement.

 

Promoting Innovation in a Global Information EconomyPromoting Innovation in a Global Information Economy
James A. Lewis
February 2008

This report explores the critical role of intellectual property protection (IPR) in a global information economy and argues that the extent to which countries protect intellectual property will determine how well they perform in the new economic environment. The report examines the status of international IPR in general and the relation of IPR to innovation in such developing economies as China, India, and Brazil, among others.

 

Building an Information Technology Industry in China Building an Information Technology Industry in China
James A. Lewis
May 8, 2007

Government support, privatization, and a removal of barriers to foreign participation have been crucial for China's IT success. But the degree and nature of this success can be easily misunderstood when China's performance is taken out of its global context. Data from the OECD show that China briefly overtook the United States as a high-tech exporter in 2005, but the Chinese government reported that 90 percent of these exports were made by foreign firms operating in China. China's leaders, who in the 1980s began to lay the groundwork for a modern IT industry, believed that China would be more secure if it did not depend on foreign IT and could instead use IT products made entirely in China. This report shows why their goal will be difficult to attain in an increasingly integrated and globalized industry.

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