Policy Recommendations for a New Administration

President Barack Obama talks with Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Essays on Western Hemisphere challenges and U.S. policy choices for the next four years.

Recommendations for a New Administration: Interests, Policies, and Challenges in the Americas
By Stephen Johnson. Ideally, foreign policy should be linked to a national security strategy that helps a country safeguard national interests and prevail in a competitive global environment.

 
 

Recommendations for a New Administration: Base Hemispheric Relations on Opportunities, Not Threats
By Howard J. Wiarda
.  Before discussing what countries the president should prioritize or what laws to change, it might be useful to look at U.S. policy on the macro level.

 
 

Recommendations for a New Administration: Justice and Police Reform for Safer, More Secure Societies
By David T. Johnson.
 New York Times columnist James "Scotty" Reston famously quipped that "Americans will do anything for Latin America except read about it."

 

Zócalo. Ciudad de México flickr\* CliNKer * http://www.flickr.com/photos/photos_clinker/3430073053/in/photostream/Recommendations for a New Administration: Safeguarding Progress with Mexico
By Duncan Wood.
 When Enrique Peña Nieto took office as president of Mexico on December 1, he already had a list of priority issues, a few of which he had briefly discussed with his U.S. counterpart on a last-minute visit to Washington on November 27.

 

Recommendations for a New Administration: Prosperity through Rule of Law and Sound Economics
By Arturo C. Porzecanski.
 U.S. foreign policy should take into account the enormous economic, political, and social diversity of Latin America and the Caribbean, and, rather than attempt to fashion a one-size-fits-all policy for the region, U.S. government priorities should be shaped by essential values and principles.
 
 

Recommendations for a New Administration: Building a Dynamic U.S.-Brazil Partnership
By Johanna Mendelson Forman, with Alek Suni.  The United States and Brazil have worked hard to deepen their bilateral relationship in spite of some recent growing pains.

 
 

Recommendations for a New Administration: Weed and Lead with Canada
By Christopher Sands.
  Canada is the United States' largest economic partner, with more than $1 million in trade per minute crossing the border every year.

 

 

 

Recommendations for a New Administration: Be a Good Neighbor to the Caribbean
By Anton Edmunds.
 While vacationers think of the Caribbean in terms of suns and beaches, U.S. policymakers tend to think of it in terms of coutnernarcotics, humanitarian aid, and HIV/AIDS mitigation.

 

 

Recommendations for a New Administration: Move beyond the Drug Focus in the Andes
By Phillip McLean.
 For 25 years the U.S. government has had an “Andean policy,” focused primarily on keeping drugs produced in South America from arriving in the United States.

 

 
 

Recommendations for a New Administration: Strategize the Relationship with Bolivarian States
By Douglas Farah.
 Over the past decade, there has been little sustained U.S. interest in the Bolivarian revolution, the significant inroads made in shaping the hemispheric agenda and organizations, the systematic undermining of U.S. objectives, and the creation of multiple regional and hemispheric bodies designed specifically to isolate or minimize U.S. influence.

 
 

Recommendations for a New Administration: Give Hemispheric Energy Policy a Strategic Vision
By Johanna Mendelson Forman, Stephen Johnson, and Michael Graybeal.
 Four years ago U.S. energy policy in the Americas arose from a sense of energy scarcity.  Today the situation has changed.